Leaving the EU

The UK is leaving the EU. This decision was made by the majority of those who voted in the EU referendum. Parliament and Government will now deliver the will of the people. In every vote in Parliament, I have respected the result and sought to give Theresa May the strongest hand to negotiate a good settlement, and new trading relationship, with the 27 remaining EU members. Regardless of votes case last June, it has to be in the interest of everyone in the UK that we move forward and focus on getting the best deal for our nation.

During the EU referendum, I wrote to all of my constituents to provide information and an invite to eight public meetings across the constituency. During these meetings, I explained, with balance, what the legal process would be if the UK voted to leave and what reforms would occur if we remained. I took this stance because I strongly believe that referendums are for the people, and not politicians, to influence. By remaining balanced, I was able to help, rather than lecture. When it came to it, I cast my vote to remain and made this public on polling day. Having not campaigned for one side or the other, I was always going to be entirely comfortable carrying out the mandate of the side which gained the most votes.

With Article 50 having been triggered, Parliament is now in the process of ensuring that all EU laws and rights which exist for UK citizens are transferred to UK legislation so, on the day we leave the EU, all rights will remain as previously granted. This bill is called the EU Withdrawal Bill. You can find more news, published articles and information on the EU Withdrawal Bill and the UK’s negotiations with the EU below:

 

News

Exiting the European Union

Today the Prime Minister gave a statement on the UK's future economic relationship with the EU. Huw's question to the Prime Minister was welcomed, highlighting the shared interest of the UK and the EU in delivering a deal that benefits all.

Amendment 7, to Clause 9, of the EU Withdrawal Bill

I have been contacted by constituents who have inquired as to whether Parliament will get a say on the final terms covering the departure of the UK from the EU and the new agreement which may govern our future terms. In particular, I have been asked if I will be voting for an Amendment 7, to Clause 9, of the EU Withdrawal Bill, which, it is claimed, would give Parliament greater power to scrutinise our exit terms.

Departure Date for Leaving the EU

Constituents have contacted me following speculation as to when the UK will leave the European Union. This matter has received heightened interest because the Government has proposed an amendment to the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill which would make it absolutely clear that Britain will be leaving at 11pm on 29 March 2019 (being midnight in mainland Europe). Those who are reluctant about Britain leaving the EU do not want this hard deadline imposed and would rather amend the Bill to permit a later date being used (or no such date at all).

Leaving the EU: Disclosing Views to Parliament

In the House of Commons, I spoke up for transparency and the need for Government to keep Parliament updated on the views, analysis and positions collected across Whitehall.

Leaving the EU

A large number of constituents have contacted me regarding the current process around Britain leaving the European Union.

Why the EU Withdrawal Bill got my vote

With the referendum result being won by the majority who voted to leave the EU, and with 492 out of 650 MPs voting to trigger Article 50 earlier this year, we are now in to the mechanics of leaving the EU and negotiating a new relationship with our EU partners and other countries across the world