Leaving the EU

The UK is leaving the EU. This decision was made by the majority of those who voted in the EU referendum. Parliament and Government will now deliver the will of the people. In every vote in Parliament, I have respected the result and sought to give Theresa May the strongest hand to negotiate a good settlement, and new trading relationship, with the 27 remaining EU members. Regardless of votes case last June, it has to be in the interest of everyone in the UK that we move forward and focus on getting the best deal for our nation.

During the EU referendum, I wrote to all of my constituents to provide information and an invite to eight public meetings across the constituency. During these meetings, I explained, with balance, what the legal process would be if the UK voted to leave and what reforms would occur if we remained. I took this stance because I strongly believe that referendums are for the people, and not politicians, to influence. By remaining balanced, I was able to help, rather than lecture. When it came to it, I cast my vote to remain and made this public on polling day. Having not campaigned for one side or the other, I was always going to be entirely comfortable carrying out the mandate of the side which gained the most votes.

With Article 50 having been triggered, Parliament is now in the process of ensuring that all EU laws and rights which exist for UK citizens are transferred to UK legislation so, on the day we leave the EU, all rights will remain as previously granted. This bill is called the EU Withdrawal Bill. You can find more news, published articles and information on the EU Withdrawal Bill and the UK’s negotiations with the EU below:

 

News

Leaving the EU

A large number of constituents have contacted me regarding the current process around Britain leaving the European Union.

Why the EU Withdrawal Bill got my vote

With the referendum result being won by the majority who voted to leave the EU, and with 492 out of 650 MPs voting to trigger Article 50 earlier this year, we are now in to the mechanics of leaving the EU and negotiating a new relationship with our EU partners and other countries across the world

Looking at priorities to work together

Being returned as your MP meant I immediately returned to Parliament on the Monday after the General Election. It is nice to see some new faces in Westminster but sad not to see those more familiar, such as my colleague from Eastbourne, Caroline Ansell, one of the nicest people in politics.

A new relationship with the EU

This week, the Prime Minister triggered Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union. The United Kingdom is formally leaving the European Union. Focus now turns to our terms for departure and the new relationship which we have to deliver with the 27 countries who will remain.

A Beginners Guide to How Parliament Makes Law

Last week Parliament was again debating and voting on the legislation which, when passed, will give the Government the powers needed to start the process of leaving the EU.

My Vote for Article 50

UPDATE - 13/02/2017

The amendments presented by the House of Lords were rejected by MPs on 13 March 2017 by 335 votes to 287. The Lords accepted the decision by 274 to 135. I can confirm that I voted against the amendments.

 

UPDATE - 06/02/2017

Britain is leaving the single market

We are leaving the European Union. Many readers may have thought that this news was established last June. For those less sure, the Prime Minister's speech this week should leave no one in any doubt that Britain will be leaving not just the EU but the single market and its customs union.

Opposition Debate on Article 50 and Leaving the EU

Today in Parliament, yet another attempt will be made to debate the merits of Britain's withdrawal from the European Union. The media are making this out to be some form of referendum by MPs on our status with the EU.